Current Research

Ongoing research is continuing on the TCHEP project using and adding to the wealth of data collected. Two of the current research projects are the Lawn and Yard Care Choices study and the Upstream flux of Phosphorus to Household Food Systems study.

Lawn and Yard Care Choices

Homeowners' yard care practices affect nutrient fluxes, soil systems, and water quality in urban areas. However, few studies have examined homeowners' yard care decisions and their interactions with urban ecosystems. The Lawn and Yard Care Choices study examines homeowners' yard care choices and their influence on C, N, and P fluxes in the Twin Cities. Findings from this research can inform the design of yard care resources for homeowners and urban policies to improve water and soil quality while supporting households' preferred yard qualities and functions. Kristen Nelson (nelso468@umn.edu) and Maria Dahmus conducting the study.

To learn more, please see the Lawn and Yard Care Choices page.

Upstream Flux of Phosphorus to Household Food Systems

Phosphorus is not only a non-renewable resource that is being globally depleted, but is also an essential nutrient for agricultural production. Research has indicated that the most direct contributor to the flux of P into the urban ecosystem is human diet. Once consumed, nearly all of that P leaves the household as wastewater, often leading to impairment of our water resources. The purpose of this study is to examine how the total upstream flux of P within the state of Minnesota is influenced by Twin Cities household's dietary food choices. Heidi Peterson (pete6495@umn.edu) and Larry Baker (baker127@umn.edu) are conducting the study.

To learn more, please see the Upstream Flux of Phosphorus to Household Food Systems page.